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Memory OC Showdown: Frequency vs. Memory Timings on AM4 platform Agesa Microcode 1006
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chispy
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Thumbs up Memory OC Showdown: Frequency vs. Memory Timings on AM4 platform Agesa Microcode 1006 - 07-14-2017, 21:13 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

Memory OC Showdown: Frequency vs. Memory Timings
Posted by rhallock AMD Employee in Gaming on Jul 14, 2017 11:20:08 AM


Great read and a lot of useful information from AMD:

The release of AGESA 1.0.0.6 to mobo makers has resulted in a wave of fresh BIOS updates, each one packed with tons of new options for tweaking and overclocking memory.1 With so many options at your disposal, some have understandably asked: “what are the optimal settings for games?” Never one to leave an overclocking question unanswered, our illustrious overclocker Sami Makinen took his ASUS Crosshair VI and AMD Ryzen™ 1700 CPU for a spin to find the fastest combination of settings in a few different tests.

Before we dig into the data, here’s what we analyzed:
The impact of the new BankGroupSwap (BGS) BIOS option
Single-rank DIMMs vs. dual-rank DIMMs
Automatic sub-timings vs. manually-tweaked subtimings
Max frequency vs. lower frequency at tighter timings
Geardown Mode (GDM) on vs. off

Digging into geardown mode

Let’s start with the impact of Geardown Mode (GDM), as it’s easy to address.

GDM is enabled by default for memory speeds greater than DDR4-2667 per the DDR4 spec. GDM allows the RAM to use a clock that’s one half the true DRAM frequency for the purposes of latching (storing a value) on the memory’s command or address buses. This conservative latching can potentially allow for higher clockspeeds, broader compatibility, and better stability—good for the average user.

But what about overclockers? For overclockers, Geardown Mode will be noteworthy because it also tells the memory subsystem to "disregard" the command rate set in the BIOS. As 1T command rates can be beneficial (though tough to maintain) for performance, the chart below is really asking whether it’s useful to run GDM if the desired memory clockspeed can be achieved. Spoiler alert: probably not.





Our data points indicate that Geardown Mode should be disabled for gaming if you can achieve your desired memory overclock with a 1T command rate. The opposite holds true if 1T CR proves too aggressive to reach your desired clockspeed--leaving Geardown Mode enabled may get you there. Finally, when it comes to GDM vs. 2T CR (not shown), specific memory throughput testing should be conducted as the balance of power will come down to your other memory timings.

BankGroupSwap

BankGroupSwap (BGS) is a new memory mapping option in AGESA 1.0.0.6 that alters how applications get assigned to physical locations within the memory modules; the goal of this knob is to optimize how memory requests are executed after taking DRAM architecture and your memory timings into account. The theory goes that toggling this setting can shift the balance of performance in favor of either games or synthetic apps.

Our data seems to bear this out: our games got a little faster with BGS off, while AIDA64 memory bandwidth was higher with BGS ON.







Single rank vs. dual rank DIMMs

In the BankGroupSwap section, we alluded to “single rank” memory modules; that may have left some people scratching their head. That’s not surprising: memory ranks are largely unknown, not to mention cryptic. Starting from the top, PC enthusiasts know that a stick of memory is a circuit board with various memory chips attached. But have you ever thought about how a PC talks to those memory chips? That’s where ranks come in.

A “rank” is a group of memory chips that receive read and write commands as a group. Some memory sticks have all of their memory chips in one group, and those are single rank (SR) DIMMs. Other memory sticks split their memory chips into two groups, and those are called dual rank (DR) DIMMs.

DR modules can often be a smidge faster thanks to a capability called “rank interleaving,” wherein the second memory rank can still perform work while the first is being refreshed for use. However, DR modules are often harder for a system to drive to high frequency, which is why most high-performance memory kits use multiple 4GB or 8GB SR memory sticks. The extra frequency achievable by the SR memory modules is often enough to overcome the small performance benefit of DR DIMMs, too.

You can often tell single and dual rank memory apart by looking at the product code, which might say 1Rx4 or 1Rx8 for single rank, or 2Rx4 or 2Rx8 for dual rank. And though you should always verify with spec sheet, it’s a decent shortcut to assume an 8GB DDR4 DIMM is single rank, whereas a 16GB DIMM is almost certainly dual rank.

As we finally come to the data, our results lend credence that—all things being equal—DR memory configurations are a touch faster than SR configs for the purposes of PC gaming. But all things aren’t equal when it comes to overclocking memory, and we’ll explore that in the conclusion.





Automatic timings vs. manual tuning

Every overclocker knows that memory runs on “timings,” which are various wait periods PC memory must make as it completes a full cycle of reading or writing data. Lowering the timing values (making them more aggressive) can yield better performance by shrinking the wait periods. However, timings that are too aggressive can easily lead to instability and memory corruption as the memory struggles to accurately read and write its own data.

Motherboards generally take on all the heavy lifting of setting the complicated list of memory timings through mechanisms like SPD and XMP. These timings are configured to balance the fussy triangle of performance, compatibility, and stability. But was there something being left on the table? Sami intervened to find out, and his results couldn’t be clearer: overclockers with the wherewithal to hand-tune their memory timings can extract notably better performance in the PC games we looked at. Some games might be less sensitive to memory timings, but these tasks seem to love it.





Full timings for DDR4-3200 “maxed”: tCL = 12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60 ohms.

The ancient debate: frequency or timings?

Last, but not least, Sami set out to find whether it was tighter timings or higher clockspeeds that mattered most on the AMD Ryzen™ processor. Sami pushed this combination of hardware up to DDR4-3520, DDR4-3466 with tighter timings, and DDR4-3200 with the tightest timings that could be achieved while maintaining stability with Memtest.

The verdict: tighter timings won. DDR4-3200 with aggressive timing adjustments outperformed the looser timings needed to hit DDR4-3520, while 3466 clearly split the difference with the right balance of timings and frequency.





DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60 ohms. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60 ohms , CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3 ohms.

Putting it all together

Now that we’ve picked through the data in isolation, we thought it would prove useful to take a mile-high view and draw some conclusions about what we found from our data set, and how that might impact gaming on the AMD AM4 platform.


DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60***937;. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60 ohms , CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3 ohms.

Conclusion #1: Dual rank DIMMs (yellow) offered the best performance amongst “set and forget” (light blue, orange, yellow) memory configured automatically by XMP profiles.

Conclusion #1a: But the increased overclocking headroom of single rank modules was more than enough to overpower the benefits of rank interleaving, so manually-tuned single rank DDR4-3200 and 3466 won the day (dark blue and green).

Conclusion #2: BankGroupSwap should likely be disabled for users that want the best PC gaming performance. As always, test your specific use case.

Conclusion #3: Chasing the highest possible clockspeed required timings so relaxed that real world performance suffered versus lower frequencies with tighter timings. This is a fine balance, however, so testing on your platform is always helpful.

Conclusion #4: Geardown Mode should likely be disabled if your overclock is stable with a 1T command rate. As always, test your specific use case.

We hope these insights prove useful, and we’re looking forward to your feedback. Chat with us on Twitter @AMDRyzen or leave a comment.




Source link: https://community.amd.com/community/...memory-timings



It is time to start tweaking your ram to maximize performance !





Last edited by chispy; 07-14-2017 at 22:31.
   
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thatguy91
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Default 07-15-2017, 06:08 | posts: 6,425 | Location: Australia

Those maxed settings for 3200 are crazy low, I wonder what voltages were required for that!
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 09:13 | posts: 156 | Location: Greece

crispy single rank is when you use only 1 module of memory right ?
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 09:21 | posts: 3,612 | Location: Germany

Has anyone ever compared BGS with DR memory? My first numbers seem to be just the other way around than what's known for SR memory.
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 10:25 | posts: 816

Has anyone here explored the CLDO_VDDP setting?

I'm on 3200Mhz CL14 stable and my RAM is rated at 3600Mhz. I would like to take it to at least 3466Mhz but anything above 3200 is unstable.

I don't understand this whole movement of "memory holes" thing. Will altering that setting move the hole to something less than 3333Mhz and make 3333mhz and above possible?

I have an MSI x370 Gaming Pro Carbon and G.Skill DDR4 Trident Z 3600Mhz PC4-28800 CL17 (17-18-18-38).
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 10:55 | posts: 6,425 | Location: Australia

I have very similar RAM and motherboard, and can do 3333.

The trick is on this board to set the XMP setting, then the memory tryit! setting. From there you adjust the voltages and timings to your choice.

By doing so, and with some minor tweaking on the Advanced timings page, I get this:


That is with adjusting the tRFC down a little, as well as the tRC. Nothing too much lower than auto though! I also set tRDRDSCL and tWRWRSCL both to 5 from the auto setting of 7. I think going lower would be pushing my luck, I know I wouldn't do 2 at 3200 like in the blog article.

Those read/write scores aren't too bad for 3333! I could probably get higher, but it's not worth the extra effort considering any further gains will likely be minimal.

SOC voltage is 1.08 V, and DRAM voltage 1.370 V. I haven't tried reducing these, but I'm happy with them at that.

I hope that helps a little!

Last edited by thatguy91; 07-15-2017 at 11:30.
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 19:13 | posts: 816

Thanks for the tips, but I think my 3200 at CL14 is just a smudge faster than 3333 at CL16. I tried 3333 at CL14 but it failed the memtest quite fast.

Yours should be about 4.8ns and I should be 4.375ns.

I don't use the XMP profiles at all and use the Try It 3200CL14 with DRAM Voltage at 1.45v and SOC at 1.15. I can probably lower the DRAM but Robert Hallock from AMD recommended up to 1.5, so it should be safe.

There's also a 1.81 Beta BIOS out for the board but not sure what it includes. Any chance you tried it yet?

Last edited by aayman_farzand; 07-15-2017 at 19:15.
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 21:03 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Venix View Post
crispy single rank is when you use only 1 module of memory right ?
No , that's not what it means. Single Rank refers to the memory modules and where the chips are mounted , example Single rank = single sided memory modules , meaning the stick of memory has ram chips on one side only. While Dual Rank = dual sided memory modules , meaning the stick of memory has ram chips on both sides . I hope that helps you understand.

Kind Regards: Chispy
   
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Default 07-15-2017, 22:52 | posts: 6,425 | Location: Australia

Quote:
Originally Posted by aayman_farzand View Post
Thanks for the tips, but I think my 3200 at CL14 is just a smudge faster than 3333 at CL16. I tried 3333 at CL14 but it failed the memtest quite fast.

Yours should be about 4.8ns and I should be 4.375ns.

I don't use the XMP profiles at all and use the Try It 3200CL14 with DRAM Voltage at 1.45v and SOC at 1.15. I can probably lower the DRAM but Robert Hallock from AMD recommended up to 1.5, so it should be safe.

There's also a 1.81 Beta BIOS out for the board but not sure what it includes. Any chance you tried it yet?
I haven't tried the beta bios as I was assuming the next official one will be out shortly. I think it may include AGESA 1.0.0.6a. Next round though I might give it a try, especially if it is for a new AGESA revision.

Whilst they say that higher voltages is safe there's no telling what that would do over a couple of years, especially if you are a heavy computer user or 24/7 system. You shouldn't need anywhere near that voltage anyway. For me, I know it's the subtimings that limit getting my speed score higher, however considering the bioses are still maturing there's little point in spending the whole weekend testing etc when there's a new bios around the corner that could throw all that out. I didn't really try too hard for the 3333 as above, and I am glad I didn't!
   
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Default 07-16-2017, 01:29 | posts: 1,762

Since the article did not touch on what I am currently trying to find out, experimenting with interleave settings. Will list out what was found to be most beneficial through synthetic benchmarks. So far just playing with channel interleaving. Relating to the article, GDM disabled and BGS left on Auto for now.

Interleaving Size: 512k gives the best all around performance
Channel Interleave Hash: enabled - improved the read, write, copy, and latency just a little bit more.

So many more settings to play with. Everything related to ECC ram are not being touched yet...all left on auto till it is found out if disabled for whatever weird reason works better.
   
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Default 07-17-2017, 07:33 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguy91 View Post
I haven't tried the beta bios as I was assuming the next official one will be out shortly. I think it may include AGESA 1.0.0.6a. Next round though I might give it a try, especially if it is for a new AGESA revision.

Whilst they say that higher voltages is safe there's no telling what that would do over a couple of years, especially if you are a heavy computer user or 24/7 system. You shouldn't need anywhere near that voltage anyway. For me, I know it's the subtimings that limit getting my speed score higher, however considering the bioses are still maturing there's little point in spending the whole weekend testing etc when there's a new bios around the corner that could throw all that out. I didn't really try too hard for the 3333 as above, and I am glad I didn't!
Thank you for posting your findings and results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
Since the article did not touch on what I am currently trying to find out, experimenting with interleave settings. Will list out what was found to be most beneficial through synthetic benchmarks. So far just playing with channel interleaving. Relating to the article, GDM disabled and BGS left on Auto for now.

Interleaving Size: 512k gives the best all around performance
Channel Interleave Hash: enabled - improved the read, write, copy, and latency just a little bit more.

So many more settings to play with. Everything related to ECC ram are not being touched yet...all left on auto till it is found out if disabled for whatever weird reason works better.

Nice find Clouseau , thank you for posting your newl finding , tweaking and the report.
   
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chispy
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Default 07-17-2017, 07:49 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

It took me many of hours playing with all the memory settings on my motherboard Asus CH VI Hero and the latest and official Bios 1403 based on Agesa 1.0.0.6.2 code today but finally it is 100% stable 24/7 at this memory clocks after many trial and errors. Tested 1 hour of memtest with zero errors , ran superPi 32m five times back to back , Aida x64 memory benchmark and stress testing pass. Played all my games for a few hours also and was completely stable 100%. I'm done tweaking my memory for now , i'm more than happy with the results

DDR4-3472Mhz ( 1736 ) , gear down mode ( GDM ) off , bank group swap ( BGS ) off. 1.45v Dram voltage , 1.45v Dram boot voltage , SOC 1.15v , Timings 14-14-14-28 1T. Rest of the timings manually tweaked one by one below.

   
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mikev190
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Default 07-17-2017, 09:01 | posts: 235 | Location: UK

Quote:
Originally Posted by chispy View Post
It took me many of hours playing with all the memory settings on my motherboard Asus CH VI Hero and the latest and official Bios 1403 based on Agesa 1.0.0.6.2 code today but finally it is 100% stable 24/7 at this memory clocks after many trial and errors. Tested 1 hour of memtest with zero errors , ran superPi 32m five times back to back , Aida x64 memory benchmark and stress testing pass. Played all my games for a few hours also and was completely stable 100%. I'm done tweaking my memory for now , i'm more than happy with the results

DDR4-3472Mhz ( 1736 ) , gear down mode ( GDM ) off , bank group swap ( BGS ) off. 1.45v Dram voltage , 1.45v Dram boot voltage , SOC 1.15v , Timings 14-14-14-28 1T. Rest of the timings manually tweaked one by one below.

Where is the bank group setting in our bios? Can only find the gear down option
   
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chispy
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Default 07-18-2017, 02:31 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikev190 View Post
Where is the bank group setting in our bios? Can only find the gear down option
It was there in the older Beta bios of Agesa microcode 1.0.0.6 , indeed there was the option to turn it off or on. But on the latest official Bios directly from Asus download , Bios 1403 it is based on an updated Agesa Microcode 1.0.0.6.2 wish does not have that option anymore as it is already turned off and there is no way to turn it on ( That i know off ).

So if using latest Stable Official Bios 1403 for Asus CH VI Hero it wont be there , you will not find that option anymore. See the screenshot below Bank Group is Off by default on this Bios 1403. Hope this helps.

Kind Regards: Chispy



   
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Default 07-18-2017, 03:04 | posts: 1,762

BGS settings are found in the CBS section. There is also a BGS Alt setting as well. Both may have a purpose but inflect a decent penalty. Like Chispy stated, they are off by default so leaving them on auto is all well and good.

Advanced>AMD CBS>UMC Common Options>DRAM Memory Mapping

EDIT: All of the options here if changed from Auto result in a penalty regarding the memory subsystem unless they are providing support for the reason they are there (not sure when they would be beneficial).

All the settings am currently playing with are found here in the CBS section.

Last edited by Clouseau; 07-18-2017 at 03:18.
   
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chispy
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Default 07-18-2017, 14:07 | posts: 7,784 | Location: In Paradise :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
BGS settings are found in the CBS section. There is also a BGS Alt setting as well. Both may have a purpose but inflect a decent penalty. Like Chispy stated, they are off by default so leaving them on auto is all well and good.

Advanced>AMD CBS>UMC Common Options>DRAM Memory Mapping

EDIT: All of the options here if changed from Auto result in a penalty regarding the memory subsystem unless they are providing support for the reason they are there (not sure when they would be beneficial).

All the settings am currently playing with are found here in the CBS section.
Thank you for the findings and report Clouseau. Latest Bios Official 1403 for Asus CH VI hero it is the best Bios so far i believe. In my testing it is 100% stable rock solid and i was able to squeezed more performance out of my set up.
   
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Default 07-18-2017, 19:19 | posts: 235 | Location: UK

Quote:
Originally Posted by chispy View Post
It was there in the older Beta bios of Agesa microcode 1.0.0.6 , indeed there was the option to turn it off or on. But on the latest official Bios directly from Asus download , Bios 1403 it is based on an updated Agesa Microcode 1.0.0.6.2 wish does not have that option anymore as it is already turned off and there is no way to turn it on ( That i know off ).

So if using latest Stable Official Bios 1403 for Asus CH VI Hero it wont be there , you will not find that option anymore. See the screenshot below Bank Group is Off by default on this Bios 1403. Hope this helps.

Kind Regards: Chispy

Thanks!

I'm struggling to find the best safe voltage for 24/7 use. I can't get past 3.9Ghz without going above 1.35v. Would you say a little over would be ok? My temps don't seem to be an issue.
   
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Default 07-18-2017, 21:28 | posts: 320 | Location: Canada

The G.skill F4-3466C16D-16GTZ that I ordered got lost in the mail. I am not impressed. I now had to get the Crucial Ballistix Elite DDR4 3466 RAM, another 16GB kit instead, model BLE2K8G4D34AEEAK. It is also guaranteed Samsung B-Die. It cost me more damn money as well. It was another 15 bucks. They had no more G.Skill in stock. I am pissed right off. Anyways, I will have everything in a couple days, finally.

Last edited by DW75; 07-18-2017 at 21:35.
   
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Processor: AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
Mainboard: Asus Prime X370-PRO
Memory: 32 GB TridentZ DDR4-3200
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Default 07-18-2017, 22:56 | posts: 247 | Location: Aarhus, Denmark

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikev190 View Post
Thanks!

I'm struggling to find the best safe voltage for 24/7 use. I can't get past 3.9Ghz without going above 1.35v. Would you say a little over would be ok? My temps don't seem to be an issue.
If it's CPU voltage you are asking for, then 1.425v is max for daily use. Above that and you risk the long term life of your CPU. Personally I'm using 1.4v (with LLC 1) for 4025 MHz. Could most likely go a bit lower, but haven't bothered since it's rock stable as is.
   
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AsiJu
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Videocard: EVGA 980Ti SC+/Xtreme IV
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Default 07-19-2017, 08:45 | posts: 3,526 | Location: Finland

Quote:
Originally Posted by DW75 View Post
The G.skill F4-3466C16D-16GTZ that I ordered got lost in the mail. I am not impressed. I now had to get the Crucial Ballistix Elite DDR4 3466 RAM, another 16GB kit instead, model BLE2K8G4D34AEEAK. It is also guaranteed Samsung B-Die. It cost me more damn money as well. It was another 15 bucks. They had no more G.Skill in stock. I am pissed right off. Anyways, I will have everything in a couple days, finally.
Ouch that sucks! Too bad.

And if postal service in Canada is anything like Finland they are extremely reluctant to accept responsibility for lost deliveries.

As if them being responsible for the arrival of the stuff they deliver is somehow beyond human comprehension...
   
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mikev190
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Default 07-19-2017, 08:55 | posts: 235 | Location: UK

Quote:
Originally Posted by Webhiker View Post
If it's CPU voltage you are asking for, then 1.425v is max for daily use. Above that and you risk the long term life of your CPU. Personally I'm using 1.4v (with LLC 1) for 4025 MHz. Could most likely go a bit lower, but haven't bothered since it's rock stable as is.
Ah that's great thanks! What temps do you get at 4025mhz?

I was playing last night and can run 3950mhz at 1.344v which I thought was a good compromise.
   
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Clouseau
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Default 07-19-2017, 20:47 | posts: 1,762

Concerning the cold boot bug, Raja made this comment:

Quote:
No telling. AMD uses a third party to handle the memory controller stuff, so it depends on whether they want to work on it. What I will say is yes, if you want to run this platform, you need to work with the quirks or accept an operating point that isn't affected.
This speaks volumes even to why there was ram compatibility issues. Yes there will always be compatibility issues but working with a third party, does not matter who it is; adding a third party to the mix just makes refinements that much more difficult to achieve. Hats off to pulling off what has been accomplished so far.


Almost finished tweaking the CBS section. Thought I had it all nailed down and then proceeded to tighten a few ram timings. The tighter timings nullified some of the settings in the CBS section that had been tweaked; started over. Turns out the tighter timings accomplished more than the previous CBS tweaks. Last set of settings moving back to Auto will be finished tonight. The ram timings that had the impact: TrdrdScl_SM and TwrwrScl_SM.
   
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OnnA
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Lightbulb 07-20-2017, 05:50 | posts: 2,995 | Location: HolyWater Village

AMD EPYC (and Threadripper) is a major advance over Intel Skylake SP (and Skylake-X)
At these higher core counts, AMD's MCM approach with Infinity Fabric has allowed AMD's EPYC to BOTH outperform Skylake SP and be manufactured at a much lower cost.

And here is EPYCs only “supposed” Achilles heal – Latency (an excuse used by Barclay's Blayne Curtis to lie about Epyc)

From the Anandtech testing of Epyc 7601 ($4200) and Intel 8176 ($8700):
http://www.anandtech.com/sh...
blk size 8176 latency (ns) 7601 latency (ns) delta (ns)
0.5KB 4 5 1
1KB 9 10 1
2KB 17 11 -6
4KB 20 11 -9
8KB 23 33 10
16KB 26 62 36
32KB 40 102 62
64KB 75 107 32

AMD claims 250GB/s Memory BW. From the Anandtech testing of Epyc 7601 ($4200) and Intel 8176 ($8700), 7601 w/ 2400MHz RAM showed 207GB/s, so 2666MHz RAM would achieve 230GB/s.The one good BW out of three test methods for 8176 was 165GB/s w/ 2666MHz RAM.

If using all of EPYC 7601’s 230GB/s Memory BW (w/2666MHz RAM):
64KB transfer takes 278ns + 107ns = 385ns
32KB transfer takes 139ns + 102ns = 241ns
16KB transfer takes 70ns + 62ns = 132ns
8KB transfer takes 35ns + 33ns = 68ns
4KB transfer takes 17.5ns + 11ns = 28.5ns

If using all of 8176 165GB/s Memory BW (w/2666MHz RAM):
64KB transfer takes 388ns + 75ns = 463ns
32KB transfer takes 189ns + 40ns = 229ns
16KB transfer takes 90ns + 26ns = 116ns
8KB transfer takes 45ns + 23ns = 67ns
4KB transfer takes 22.5ns + 20ns = 42.5ns

64KB transfer Epyc 20% faster
32KB transfer Epyc 5.2% slower
16KB transfer Epyc 13.7% slower
8KB transfer Epyc 1.4% slower
4KB transfer Epyc 49% faster

Latency Shmatency, no big deal.

For large data and 64KB block sizes, Epyc wins
For small data and 4KB and 2KB block sizes. Epyc wins
For 1KB and 0.5KB (and 8KB) block sizes it is essentially a tie.
WARNING:
Iun-able-tel will try to manipulate benchmarks to use 16KB block sizes.
   
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AsiJu
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Videocard: EVGA 980Ti SC+/Xtreme IV
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Default 07-20-2017, 12:57 | posts: 3,526 | Location: Finland

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouseau View Post
Concerning the cold boot bug, Raja made this comment:
...
What's the cold boot bug? Asking because randomly my system fails first attempt of cold boot.
   
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Clouseau
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Videocard: MSI RX 480 Gamming
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Default 07-20-2017, 18:31 | posts: 1,762

Quote:
What's the cold boot bug? Asking because randomly my system fails first attempt of cold boot.
Never experienced it on the ASUS Prime X370-Pro. Some experience it every third time but for me it literally is every fifth cold boot it automatically enters safe mode. All the manual settings are still there.

Hate it because the CBS section is wiped to defaults every time when safe mode is entered because of boot failure. AMD for some reason purposely created the CBS section that way. It's an actual feature. Guess it is beneficial in that some of those settings are duplicates from other sections in the bios. While experimenting, before making the setting "permanent," it can automatically disappear upon boot failure. Unfortunately some of the settings are unique to the section.
   
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